Site Map

Cart
Ps. mexicana Guadalajara Jalisco strain
*for microscopy study only*
Ps. mexicana Guadalajara Jalisco strain
Click to enlarge image(s)
THESE SPORES ARE SOLD FOR MICROSCOPY USE ONLY. THEY ARE NOT INTENDED FOR CULTIVATION PURPOSES!!! NO SPORES TO CA, GA, or ID STATES. YOU MUST BE AT LEAST 18 YEARS OF AGE AND YOU MUST AGREE 100% WITH OUR GENERAL DISCLAMER TO PURCHASE ANY OF THESE SPORES.
This Mexicana strain is all around excellent! It's a plentiful and bountyfull fruiter producing some skyscraping fruitbodies as well as producing sclerotia of small to large size inside the substrate. ET MIX spawned by rye berries make an excellent substrate for these sacred Mexican fruits. It's original name is Teonanácatl in the Náhuatl language of the Mexica or Aztecs of Mesoamerica, meaning literally divine, sacred, or wondrous mushroom or "God's Flesh."

"Historia General de las Cosas de Nueva España", written in the years 1529-1590. It contains data on the use of intoxicating sacred mushrooms which were eaten by the Indians of Mexico at their feasts and religious ceremonies. From the Sahagun's chronicle and from other reports it can be seen that teonanácatl was not only ingested at social and festival occasions but also by witch doctors and soothsayers. The mushroom god-which the Christian missionaries called the devil- endowed them with clairvoyant properties, which enabled them, besides other things, to identify the causes of diseases and indicate the way in which they could be treated.

The use and the worship of these mushrooms by the Indians of Central America must be very ancient. In Guatemala so-called "mushroom stones" have been found. These are stones carved in the form of a pileate mushroom, in the stem of which the head or entire figure of a god is depicted. The oldest specimens found are over three thousand years old. It can therefore be concluded that the mushroom cult of the Indians dates back to more than thousands of years before Christ. More detailed historical data can be found in the monograph of the Wassons' "Mushroom, Russia and History"

Frescoes from central Mexico, dated at 300 A.D., have drawings indicating mushroom worship. Sacred mushrooms figure prominently in the Mixtec Codex Vindobonensis, the Aztec Magliabechiano Codex, and the Tepantitla frescoes of Teotihuacan.

Theres some pretty freaky tales surrounding personal experiences just speaking about these mushrooms with others while animals being nearby jump and run with their hair standing up as though they've seen a ghost as soon as the mushrooms name is said in Náhuatl with no other explination. As well as a freaky tale where bugs get squashed misteriously before the fruit is eaten by them. 
Specifications
Available In 20cc Spore Syringes
Submit a Review...